UKK-institute > Research reports (peer-reviewed) > Association between frontal plane knee control and lower extremity injuries

ASSOCIATION BETWEEN FRONTAL PLANE KNEE CONTROL AND LOWER EXTREMITY INJURIES

  • Open full article: This is link to external server  Add to shelf
  • Writer(s): Räisänen, A; Pasanen, K; Krosshaug, T; Vasankari, T; Kannus, P; Heinonen, A; Kujala, M; Avela, J; Perttunen, J; Parkkari, J;
  • Publisher: UKK-institute
  • Published: 2018
  • Type: Research reports (peer-reviewed)
  • Please note that you may need separate access rights to read the linked website
  • Published in:
  • Research method: Experimental
  • Language: English
  • Abstract: Background/aim Poor frontal plane knee control can manifest as increased dynamic knee valgus during athletic tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between frontal plane knee control and the risk of acute lower extremity injuries. In addition, we wanted to study if the single-leg squat (SLS) test can be used as a screening tool to identify athletes with an increased injury risk. Methods A total of 306 basketball and floorball players participated in the baseline SLS test and a 12-month injury registration follow-up. Acute lower extremity time-loss injuries were registered. Frontal plane knee projection angles (FPKPA) during the SLS were calculated using a two-dimensional video analysis. Results Athletes displaying a high FPKPA were 2.7 times more likely to sustain a lower extremity injury (adjusted OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.23 to 5.83) and 2.4 times more likely to sustain an ankle injury (OR 2.37, 95% CI 1.13 to 4.98). There was no statistically significant association between FPKPA and knee injury (OR 1.49, 95% CI 0.56 to 3.98). The receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated poor combined sensitivity and specificity when FPKPA was used as a screening test for lower extremity injuries (area under the curve of 0.59) and ankle injuries (area under the curve of 0.58). Conclusions Athletes displaying a large FPKPA in the SLS test had an elevated risk of acute lower extremity and ankle injuries. However, the SLS test is not sensitive and specific enough to be used as a screening tool for future injury risk. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

<< [ previous ] Sport Concussion Assessment Tool: Interpreting day-of-injury scores in professional ice hockey players (scientific article)